DNS Request Types Cheat Sheet

 

DNS Lookup Type Function Description
A IPv4 address record The A in A record stands for Address. An A record maps a domain name to the IP address (IPv4) of the computer hosting the domain.
AAAA IPv6 address record The A in A record stands for Address. An A record maps a domain name to the IP address (IPv6) of the computer hosting the domain.
ANY All cached records  “ANY” is one of the special “magic” types in DNS. Instead of being a query for a single type like A , AAAA or MX, ANY retrieves all the available types for a given name.
CCA Certification Authority Authorization (CAA) record A Certification Authority Authorization (CAA) record is used to specify which certificate authorities (CAs) are allowed to issue certificates for a domain
CNAME Canonical name record CNAME records can be used to alias one name to another. For example, if you have a server where you keep all of your documents online, it might normally be accessed through docs.example.com. You may also want to access it through documents.example.com. One way to make this possible is to add a CNAME record that points documents.example.com to docs.example.com. When someone visits documents.example.com they will see the exact same content as docs.example.com.
MX Mail exchange record MX Records tell email delivery agents where they should deliver your email. You can have many MX records for a domain, providing a way to have redundancy and ensure that email will always be delivered.
NS Name server record An NS record is used to delegate a subdomain to a set of name servers.
PTR Pointer record Pointer records are used to map a network interface (IP) to a host name. These are used for reverse DNS.
SIG Signature record SIG(0) provides protection for DNS transactions and requests that is
not provided by the regular SIG, KEY, and NXT RRs specified in [RFC 2535] (See
2931 at https://tools.ietf.org/html/r).
SOA Start of authority record Specifies authoritative information about a DNS zone, including the primary name server, the email of the domain administrator, the domain serial number, and several timers relating to refreshing the zone
SRV Service locator SRV records are often used to help with service discovery. For example, SRV records are used in Internet Telephony for defining where a SIP service may be found.
TXT Text record Carries extra data, sometimes human-readable, most of the time machine-readable such as opportunistic encryption, DomainKeys, DNS-SD, etc.

See RFC 1034 “DOMAIN NAMES – CONCEPTS AND FACILITIES” at https://www.ietf.org/
rfc/rfc1034.txt and RFC 1015 “DOMAIN NAMES – IMPLEMENTATION AND SPECIFICATION” at https://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1035.txt